Monday, June 18, 2012


  • Ceramides (pronounced ser-A-mid OR seramide) are a family of lipid molecules. A ceramide is composed of sphingosine and a fatty acid. 
  • Ceramides are found in high concentrations within the cell membrane of cells. They are one of the component lipids that make up sphingomyelin, one of the major lipids in the lipid bilayer. 
  • The most well-known functions of ceramides as cellular signals include regulating the differentiation, proliferation, programmed cell death (PCD), and apoptosis (Type I PCD) of cells.
  • Ceramides are formed as the key intermediates in the biosynthesis of all the complex sphingolipids, in which the terminal primary hydroxyl group is linked to carbohydrate, phosphate etc.

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